Welcome!

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We, the greatest of all creators, with capabilities to build cities and inspire nations, are squandering our time watching reruns of I Love Lucy. We have forgotten that whole galaxies exist within our grasp. –PG

Hi! Welcome to the internet home of Pam Grout. I am the author of 16 books, two screenplays, a live soap opera, a TV series and enough magazine articles that I haven’t starved in 20 years without a 9-5 job. On this site, you’ll find all sorts of information about my books and about my career as a freelance writer.

If you’re an editor, you can easily click on Portfolio to view writing samples from my illustrious magazine and newspaper career.

If you’re a reader of my books, you can find out more about me, read excerpts from some of the books you haven’t been lucky enough to read yet and take quizzes to see if you’re qualified as a breather, an artist or a P.L.B. (that’s person who lives big for those of you who haven’t yet read Living Big! ) And if you’re really jazzed, simply click here or on that orange RSS feed icon to the right and subscribe to my free weekly nuggets of inspiration.

Enjoy!
Pamela Sue Grout

How Wonder Woman can help you fly through the holidays with ease and joy

“I had to stop watching the news. It was making my own problems seem insignificant.” –Cartoon I just saw in the New Yorker

It’s a long story, but many years ago I met Lynda Carter at Chris Evert’s wedding. So when Warner Bros. announced yesterday that Michelle MacLaren will be directing the new Wonder Woman movie, the first big budget superhero movie about a woman, I thought about Lynda (who will probably not be cast in the movie) and decided I would practice her superpowers this week. Here’s why:

Scientists have proven that when you stand like Wonder Woman (fists on waist and legs spread in what Harvard Business School professor Amy Cuddy calls a power pose) you lower your cortisol levels and boost your testosterone.

“So what?” you might be thinking. WHAT is that when your cortisol levels go down, you drastically lower your stress and when testosterone goes up, you feel more confident.

Cuddy discovered that standing in this pose for a mere two minutes helps folks ace job interviews, tests and other potentially stress-provoking events.

Which is why I plan to strike this pose throughout the holidays, whenever I’m tempted to get testy with relatives or to feel time pressure about the 14 dishes I’m attempting to maneuver into the oven at the same time.

I plan to slip into the bathroom (Superman used a phone booth, but, thanks to cell phones, they’re practically obsolete), strike my Wonder Woman pose and come out, if not in cape, a whole lot calmer and happier.

I’d like to thank Dirk Stroda for introducing me to Amy Cuddy’s fabulous TED talk. I just met Dirk and his beautiful wife Verena in the Okanagan Valley of Canada. Dirk, who is a coach to executives and Olympic athletes, also taught me how to procure free drugs—well, oxytocin which is the love drug and the only one I’m interested in stockpiling. It can be manufactured IN THE BODY without Walter White’s goggles and messy law enforcement problem.

The point is…our physiology (like I point out in the Boggie Woogie Experiment in E-Cubed) can help us get our mind back on the joy frequency.

Dirk and I gave a workshop together at Sparkling Hill Resort, an unbelievably cool health resort with eight different saunas and steam rooms (one of them even had the same ceiling as the Sistine Chapel) and more than 3 million Swarovski crystals. Do I have a cool job or what?

The last little tip I’d like to share for sailing through the holidays is to sing. Jay Pryor, another cool friend of mine, from one of my power posses, and his wife Jessica have started singing to their two young kids. Instead of demanding that they come to dinner or stop drawing on the Lazy-Boy, they simply break into an operatic aria that more effectively gets the point across.

And lastly, because I was tempted to join a protest after last night’s Grand Jury decision in Ferguson, I’d like to present yet another headline in the world I’m envisioning:

Police officers all over the world give up their guns and realize the best way to do their job is to shoot love, not fear

Pam Grout is the author of 17 books including E-Squared: 9 Do-it-Yourself Energy Experiments that Prove Your Thoughts Create Your Reality and the just-released sequel, E-Cubed, 9 More Experiments that Prove Mirth, Magic and Merriment is your Full-time Gig.

Tune in to the frequency of gratitude each morning so the mothership can find you

“What good are all the courses, initiations and headstands if, in the end, the ego does the leading.”—Tosha Silver
amazingly awesome

You wouldn’t go on a date without brushing your teeth.

Or write a resume without adding your phone number.

So why do we persist in starting our days without tuning into the Divine Buzz?

This Divine Buzz, F.P. (take your pick) is a loving force, folks, that wants nothing but to connect with us, to guide us, to bestow upon us every blessing we could possibly think up and a bunch we haven’t even come up with yet.

But instead of tuning in to this ocean of awesomeness, we’re tuned into this other frequency that limits the transmission. Anne Lamott recently wrote about a book signing in Wichita, Kansas where she was, as she describes it, “in whiny baby mode.”

On that transmission, the mothership couldn’t locate her. Couldn’t help her transcend her bad mood.

But by tuning into the frequency of gratitude, the “oh yea! I’m an author and I get to travel around and meet my readers. How cool is that?,” the “mothership” came to the rescue.

The mothership is always circling, always waiting with answers to every single need. Our only mission, and why wouldn’t we choose to accept it, is to stay on that frequency of gratitude where it can get through.

Pam Grout is the author of 17 books including E-Squared: 9 Do-it-Yourself Energy Experiments that Prove Your Thoughts Create Your Reality and the just-released sequel, E-Cubed, 9 More Experiments that Prove Mirth, Magic and Merriment is your Full-time Gig.

Quit shoulding on yourself

“As long as your experience of self and life is defined by the mechanical, conditioned, and compulsive movement of thought, you are bound to a very, very limited perception of what is real.”–Adyashanti

It starts the moment we’re born. Doctors (or probably nurses these days) measure and weigh us, giving us the message that there’s a proper height and weight we need to be.

Then we learn that language (and all the rules conveyed by language) is more important than those imaginary friends that tell us exactly what we need to know.

Spirit, the universe, the F.P., God (lots of synonyms for this thing I often call the Divine Buzz) has never deserted us, but we’re so busy with our dark clouds of guilt and shame, the “should storm” that begins the moment all the frightened adults start administering “tests,” that we fail to notice, we fail to appreciate its unending gifts.

Even the self-help literature (and, yes, I’m one of its dispensers) sometimes makes us feel guilty. Oh no! I’m having a negative thought. Oh, no! I’m not vibrating enough joy.

You know what? It doesn’t matter. If you simply let go of all the “shoulds” that have infiltrated the Truth of who you are, you will be guided, blessed and constantly taken care of.

As my lesson in A Course in Miracles says today: The only sacrifice asked by this Infinite Intelligence is to give up all suffering, all sense of loss and sadness, all anxiety and doubt.

The good news is that minus the “should storm,” LOVE comes streaming in, healing all pain and granting the awareness of eternal joy.

Also want to share this beautiful blog that a friend sent me. It’s more of the new and improved headlines we all wrote yesterday.

And lastly, Hay House would like me to remind you that both E-Squared and E-Cubed are going for a measly $1.99 on the Amazon Kindle store.

Pam Grout is the author of 17 books including E-Squared: 9 Do-it-Yourself Energy Experiments that Prove Your Thoughts Create Your Reality and the just-released sequel, E-Cubed, 9 More Experiments that Prove Mirth, Magic and Merriment is your Full-time Gig.

Why “what’s possible” is far more important than “what is”

“Without leaps of imagination or dreaming, we lose the excitement of possibilities. Dreaming, after all is a form of planning.” ― Gloria Steinem

We have a choice. We can place our attention on “what is” or we can dream of what can be. By placing our attention on new possibilities, we animate a completely different future.

Here are the headlines I’m envisioning for today:

New Ebola cases in Africa fall to zero

U.S. Democrats and Republicans hug it out on the Senate floor

The Middle East celebrate 10 years of peaceful coexistence

Snows return to Kilimanjaro

Pam Grout appears on Super Soul Sunday

Tell me in the comments section below: What’s your new headline?

Pam Grout is the author of 17 books including E-Squared: 9 Do-it-Yourself Energy Experiments that Prove Your Thoughts Create Your Reality and the just-released sequel, E-Cubed, 9 More Experiments that Prove Mirth, Magic and Merriment is your Full-time Gig.

Why you should give everything you have for as long as you physically can. Shane Burcaw @shaner528


‘Promise me that you’ll always remember that you’re braver than you believe, stronger than you seem and smarter than you think.’–Christopher Robin to Winnie the Pooh

My naysayers (and they are legion) rarely attack my writing (well, a few accuse me of trying to be a standup comedian). The thing they seem to take issue with is my belief that life is meant to be a glorious adventure, that happiness is a choice.

They say things like, “But what about war? What about kids born with disabilities?”

And I refuse to be swayed. Our head space is 100 percent up to us. I read a book over the weekend that, if we were in a courtroom, I would present as Exhibit A.

It’s called Laughing at My Nightmare. It’s by Shane Burcaw, a 21-year-old wiseass blogger who happens to have spinal muscular atrophy. He has been in a wheelchair since he was three. His parents or his younger brother have to pick him up and put him into bed at night. When he has to pee, they have to put his penis (did I just say the word penis in a blog post?) in what he calls “a pee jar.”

If anyone has a right to dispute my beliefs, it would be Shane. Yet, this amazing young man has more fun and a better attitude than many of us with fully functioning bodies. His mission, in fact, is to rid the world of negativity. He believes we get through adversity by laughing, by having fun.

He has a girlfriend (who he actually proposed to in the book), he graduated from Moravian College, he started a nonprofit to help others with muscular dystrophy (move over, Jerry Lewis) and Rainn Wilson (Dwight Schrute on The office) did a movie about his life. As Wilson says on the cover, “I would help change his underpants anytime.”

But most of all, Shane spends his time coming up with big adventures and crazy schemes. And proving to people that it is only our misguided thoughts that could ever make us unhappy.

P.S. Hay House asked me to mention that, if you’ve been waiting to buy E-Cubed, now is the time. It and its sister, E-Squared, are going for a measly $1.99 on the Amazon, Kindle store.

Pam Grout is the author of 17 books including E-Squared: 9 Do-it-Yourself Energy Experiments that Prove Your Thoughts Create Your Reality and the just-released sequel, E-Cubed, 9 More Experiments that Prove Mirth, Magic and Merriment is your Full-time Gig.

The top six things our children can teach us

“All children are artists. The problem is how to remain an artist once you grow up.”–Pablo Picasso

kids v adults

In London last month, at the I Can Do It! conference, I conducted a reverse finishing school for adults. Here’s why.

Kids know important stuff, stuff we mature adults work very hard to unteach them. But maybe instead of urging our children to “be careful” and “act responsible,” we should follow their lead.

Here are the top six things preschoolers have over us:

1. Make believe. You don’t have to tell a kid that “anything is possible.” They’re pros at “pretend” or what behavioral specialists call visualization. Olympic athletes, in fact, spend nearly as many hours mentally rehearsing their success as they do physically practicing. Well, duh? our kids could tell us. They don’t need anyone’s permission to be a pilot or a doctor or an architect. They’re already flying around the room and healing their dolls’ boo-boos and building sand castles. They know popsicle sticks can be boats, batons or bridges over moats. Or better yet, lined up all the way to Bulgaria.

2. The opposite game. Remember how much fun it was to state everything backwards, to say “I don’t like you very much” which, of course, meant “You are everything to me.” If we could only realize that our political opponents and anyone else who disagrees with us or nags at us or call us names are really just playing “the opposite game.” Then we could quit taking everything so personally and remember that the biggest secret in the world is “we all really love each other.”

3. Tag, you’re it. Instead of hogging all the attention, kids chase each other around and parlay being “it.” And, needless to say, we all want to be “it” from time to time.

4. Cry when they’re hurt. Instead of pretending to be all “cool” and “together,” kids just lay it on the line. The only games they play are for fun. They don’t care what color or sexual orientation or religion a playmate is. In fact, they don’t notice differences at all. I have a friend who lost his arm when he was in the Navy. Until kids get to the age of 5 or so, they don’t even notice that he’s missing his right arm. It’s remarkable the day kids he’s known since they were babies suddenly notice. “What happened to your arm?” they ask in utter amazement. Of course, their mom’s give them dirty looks and tell them to “pipe down.”

5. Show-and-tell. Think how much closer we’d all be if we stopped long enough to honor one another in a circle of show-and-tell. If we listened to one another’s stories, looked at each other’s creations. Why isn’t this a normal thing? Every week or so we should get together with families and friends and show them something we really like, something unique about us. Bring in some doodle we made on the side of a Visa bill or something we thought up while waiting at the dry cleaners. Adults still think things up. We just don’t tell anyone. We don’t think it’s important. Not with lawns that need mowing and mufflers that need fixing.

6. What’s the hurry? If you want to expand your world, go on a walk with a five-year-old. They notice everything. The sun glinting off the mud puddle. The snail making figure eights of slime along the sidewalk. The hawk perched on the neighbor’s mailbox. Sure, you know everybody’s Facebook status registered on a little screen. But preschoolers? They know everything else.

Pam Grout is the author of 17 books including E-Squared: 9 Do-it-Yourself Energy Experiments that Prove Your Thoughts Create Your Reality and the just-released sequel, E-Cubed, 9 More Experiments that Prove Mirth, Magic and Merriment is your Full-time Gig.

Perfect ten? What’s in YOUR wallet? Or rather your mind.

“Life is such an amazing, beautiful, joy ride of adventure!”–Bridget Hieronymous

I went to a workshop last weekend, given by my new friend, MK Mueller. She’s a trainer, author and creator of the 8 to Great program that she has shared with everyone from Fortune 500 execs to residents of homeless shelters.

She’s an amazing woman who developed these eight empowering principles after finding herself at a domestic violence shelter—as a resident, not a teacher.

In other words, she took a rock bottom life and turned it into a beautiful message for the world.

I particularly loved one of the stories she shared about Mary Lou Retton. Remember her? The gymnast who won five medals in the 1984 Summer Olympics? She was once on a Wheaties box and Sports Illustrated named her “Sportswoman of the Year” after she brought home the gold in the individual all-around competition.

Here’s how it went down: Retton needed perfect 10’s on her vault—from all three judges—if she was going to beat Romanian gymnast Ecaterina Szabo who had edged ahead by .15 of a point.

Mary Lou didn’t focus on her right knee that required arthroscopic surgery two months before the games. She didn’t focus on the hip dysplasia she was born with. She focused on the same thing she’d been focusing on for the last eight years—getting a perfect ten.

Afterwards, when reporters asked her, “How did it feel to get perfect 10’s from all three judges?,” she said, “It felt like it always does.”

“But,” they stopped her, “You’ve never done it before.”

“Oh yes I have,” she said. “Thousands of times in my mind.”

Loved this reminder that what shows up in our lives is more or less a clone of thoughts we’ve held in our mind.

Pam Grout is the author of 17 books including E-Squared: 9 Do-it-Yourself Energy Experiments that Prove Your Thoughts Create Your Reality and the just-released sequel, E-Cubed, 9 More Experiments that Prove Mirth, Magic and Merriment is your Full-time Gig.

Random acts of forgiveness: a new movement starting today

“I used to be Snow White, but I drifted.”—Mae West

I had a different post planned for today. But I woke up this morning to some news that simply MUST. BE. SHARED.

Last week, a woman from Derbyshire, England asked her followers to retweet the idea that “we’re seeing more and more good news. That we’re finally starting to “get” the idea about “loving your enemy.” Maybe she added my twitter handle because that’s one of my goals—-to change the dominant paradigm, to encourage people to start recognizing all the good that’s happening, to take the focus OFF “what’s wrong” and place it back where it belongs. On blessings and miracles.

Well, this morning she tweeted “And so it begins…” with a story about a former radical anti-Muslim who went to a Mosque to apologize.

As he says, “I’ve been an unwitting twat and let my beliefs be manipulated to further an opposite agenda.”

He ended up talking with folks at the Crayford mosque for an hour. He couldn’t get over how nice and loving they were.

This is big news, folks. And here’s what I’d like to propose, let’s start a movement where, each day, we apologize to someone we’ve held out of our hearts for whatever reason.

Granted, it’s a little bit trickier than random acts of kindness, but, wow! what a difference we can make. Forgiveness erases all the gunk that keeps us from recognizing the world’s largesse and this profound secret: “Even though we sometimes play “the opposite game,” we all really love each other.

Pam Grout is the author of 17 books including E-Squared: 9 Do-it-Yourself Energy Experiments that Prove Your Thoughts Create Your Reality and the just-released sequel, E-Cubed, 9 More Experiments that Prove Mirth, Magic and Merriment is your Full-time Gig.

Dancing with the Stars…. and the moon and the people in the coffee shop line

“Let us dance in the sun, wearing wild flowers in our hair…”
― Susan Polis Schutz

Today, I’d like to introduce you to what I consider one of the most important spiritual practices. Erupting into spontaneous dance. In places besides dance floors.

Here are five reasons it’s as important as meditation:

1. It cuts thought off at the knees
. All spiritual practice is about getting out of our own way, letting go of all the thoughts that block the Divine Buzz. The majority of our thoughts are boring re-runs from yesterday, the same ole to-do lists, fears and gripes.

And the Truth is that life works just fine without our incessant input. In fact, the more we distract the yammer, the better things actually work. This may seem counterproductive, but your right and perfect path will show up once you quit trying to figure everything out. It’s all the figuring and fretting that keeps it away. Dancing shuts down the mind so Truth can emerge.

2. Dancing puts you on the same wavelength as the F.P. As I’ve repeatedly said, you can’t watch ABC if you’re tuned into NBC. When you’re joyfully dancing, you’re on the same channel as the Big Guy. Which, of course, makes it easier for the F.P. to pour out all those countless blessings with your name on it.

3. It makes other people happy. I spend a lot of time in airports. And for the most part, the thousands of people waiting for flights are doing the same thing. Staring at their cell phones. One day in the Cincinnati airport, my daughter and I spotted (well, there was really no possibility of missing him) this tall gangly young man dancing jubilantly through the terminal. By himself. We were sitting at a Chick Fil A (this is before I began boycotting them) when he zoomed joyfully by. We both began laughing and like the young children in the German fairytale, The Pied Piper, we began to follow him.

Who can forget this wonderful scene from the movie, The Full Monte, where these unemployed steel workers began tapping their feet while waiting in the unemployment line?

4. It heals your body and other ailments. My friend, Betty, is 82. Most of her peers, when they get together, discuss one thing—their health or lack thereof. What she discovered when she took up dancing, the conversation (between Fox Trots) became elevated and people forgot all about their health issues. They actually started having fun, feeling young again.

5. It jars you into a new reality. Worldview 2.0, the exciting new paradigm I write about in E-Cubed, is all about leaving ruts and mental architecture that squeezes us into a tiny, uncomfortable box. Worldview 1.0 includes dancing, of course, but, once we’re grown-up, it only occurs when there’s alcohol and a dance floor. By dancing in places where others don’t expect it, you jump out of the box and your consciousness can’t help but follow. Again, life forms around our beliefs and expectations (our consciousness), so the more we can expand our beliefs and expectations, the bigger toehold life has to flow in.

I’ve shown this one before, but it’s worth repeating…..

Pam Grout is the author of 17 books including E-Squared: 9 Do-it-Yourself Energy Experiments that Prove Your Thoughts Create Your Reality and the just-released sequel, E-Cubed, 9 More Experiments that Prove Mirth, Magic and Merriment is your Full-time Gig.

Boldly claim your good. The universe is never reluctant to give.

Chris Michaels, a handsome and very wise Science of Mind minister, told a great story a few weeks ago.

He explained that when you make an intention (or pray or send out a ‘rocket of desire,’ as LOA students might call it), you must act with authority. You must KNOW that your words and consciousness are powerful.

Remember that bit in the Lord’s Prayer where we say, “Give us this day our daily bread?”

“Our daily bread,” say Chris, “is everything we need to live well and be happy. How bold. How absolutely courageous!!”

Notice that Jesus taught us to command.

He didn’t beg. He didn’t plead. He didn’t even ask. Or say, “Please, pretty, pretty please, God, send me a loaf of pumpernickel.”

Jesus knew his word had power. He knew that when he spoke, his word was activated by a law of energy that only knows how to deliver whatever is held in consciousness.

You don’t beg the soil to grow a plant. You simply put a seed in the ground and watch it grow. You don’t plead with your coffee pot to make your morning coffee. You don’t stand over it and say.“Please, God, I’ve been really good and I need some caffeine.”

No, you simply plug it in. You place a demand upon the law of electricity by plugging in your coffee pot. And you know with complete authority that within a few minutes you’ll have coffee.

We simply must give up this notion that there is a reluctance by the universe to provide our good.

There is never hesitation on the part of the universe to give you absolutely everything good you can possibly imagine. But nothing can be given until it is claimed.

Pam Grout is the author of 17 books including E-Squared: 9 Do-it-Yourself Energy Experiments that Prove Your Thoughts Create Your Reality and the just-released sequel, E-Cubed, 9 More Experiments that Prove Mirth, Magic and Merriment is your Full-time Gig.

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